Where Do You WANT to Be Five Years From Now

The Harvard Business Review published this article last week discussing a question we’ve all undoubtedly asked ourselves, “where will I be five years from now?”.

To me though, the more important question is “where do I want to be five years from now?”.   Whether you’re a student, an entrepreneur or the CEO of a fortune 500 company, your goals are only as good as the plan you put in place to achieve them. 

Over time circumstances will change and what you once believed would be you “five years from now” may not become your reality.  Where you are five years from now will depend on the path you take to get there and the critical decisions you make along the way.  As they say, you miss 100% of the shots you never take.  It’s easy to dream big, but it take guts to make it your mission to achieve them.

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Web Evolution – A History of Web Design Over the Past 20 Years

Below is a graphic developed by KISSmetrics outlining the evolution of web design since the world’s first website was launched  in 1991.

In only 20 years the definition of a “web presence” has evolved to the point that today, many argue that traditional websites are becoming obsolete.  When discussing the promotion of his new book, Guy Kawasaki recently suggested that he didn’t need a website to reach his target customers, but a Facebook page instead.

Static websites are a thing of the past and concepts like collaboration and crowd sourcing are becoming web standards.  Of course, the evolution will continue and even these concepts will become old news (probably even faster than traditional web pages).  The infographic below is a great reflection of where we’ve been in such a short period of time.  One can only speculate what this chart will look like 20 years from today.

The Daily

On February 2nd, the Daily became available on Apple’s iPad app store with a mission to provide a unique online news experience specifically for the iPad.  For some time the publishing industry has struggled to monetize online news content because of the availability free information on the Internet, but the creators of the Daily appear to be taking a step in the right direction.

Below is an overview of the Daily and some of it’s unique functionalities:

Described as living news, the Daily “combines text, image, sound, video and movement to tell stories that come alive the more you touch, swipe, tap and expolore”.

3 Reasons It’s Different

  1. Much of the Daily’s content is opinion-based, differentiating it from free sources of information that focus primarily on “the facts”.
  2. The Daily has been built specifically for the iPad, offering a superior viewing experience to competing offerings.
  3. It’s customizable and interactive; customers can indicate preferences including local weater and their favourite sports teams.

Recognizing that potential customers may need to experience the Daily to understand it’s value, the product is available for free on a two week trial.  Regularly the Daily is sold for only $39.00 a year or $0.99 a day.  If you don’t yet see the value proposition, I suggest you give it a try.  If nothing else you’ll get a taste for the direction the publishing industry is heading and the new formats publishers are testing to enhance the value of their content.

Guy Kawasaki: Enchantment

In the video below, marketing guru Guy Kawasaki talks about his latest book “Enchantment:  The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds and Actions”. Guy discusses what he views as the pillars of enchantment; likability, trustworthiness and great cause.

It’s clear that while marketing contributes to the bottom line, it’s great products that are the cornerstone for any company’s success.  Marketing can optimize the success of a product offering, but without quality products it’s unrealistic to expect enchantment be achieved. What makes your products great?

Social Media Metics and ROI

Since the emergence of social media marketing as a way of maintaining a continual dialogue and brand recognition with customers, brand marketers have struggled to understand the true impact of their online efforts.

Syncapse recently published a whitepaper on  understanding Facebook fan value and key return on investment indicators.  I recommend that any brand marketer interested in better understanding the online landscape and the value of engaging customers through social media platforms read it and consider how to provide relevant content to potential customers (and convert them to brand ambassadors) online.

Similar to a Twitter follower, a Facebook fan will be more valuable if they have a true interest in your brand and product offerings.  The number of facebook fans a brand collects is less important than who those fans are.  In other words, quality trumps quantity.  Knowing who is following your brand will go a long way in understanding their value and the return on your online activities.

What does your company do to assess the quality of your social media following?

Roll Up the Rim is Back!

Today marks day one of Tim Horton’s yearly Roll Up the Rim competition slated during periods of the year when coffee consumption is typically at it’s lowest. I thought this would be a good opportunity to re-post a piece I wrote last year on the growing perception of the contest based on online consumer reaction.  Is Tim Horton’s doing enough to keep customers interested in Roll Up the Rim to Win?

Please Play Again

Last month I blasted McDonald’s for their free coffee giveaway and praised Tim Horton’s for the brand loyalty they’ve developed, in part through their Roll Up the Rim campaign. However, just over a month into Tim Horton’s annual contest, I’m back to acknowledge the shortcomings of my initial comments.

The free flow of communication and information online have allowed consumers to have a much stronger voice when it comes to criticizing brands. No longer can companies hide from their deficiencies without feeling the wrath of harsh consumer feedback through various online channels.

Please Play Again

A search for “#TimHortons” on Twitter will quickly highlight the consumer perception of the coffee shop’s Roll Up the Rim campaign today. Many customers are clearly upset with both the success rate they’re experiencing and the quality of the prizes they receive when they do actually win.

Today, companies are forced to be more responsible for their marketing efforts, and while the online space allows for greater interaction with customers, it also comes with an open line for criticism. This is not necessarily a bad thing if brands are able to respond to feedback through positive change; however, companies unwilling to make the effort must tread carefully. If Tim Horton’s is not careful, they’ll quickly find more and more customers refusing to ‘please play again’.

New Nike Commercial: Tiger Woods

Nike has taken some heat for the way they’ve handled their sponsorship of Tiger Woods, for a couple of reasons:

 a) Many are of the opinion that Nike should have stopped supporting him when news broke of Tiger’s now infamous sex scandal.

b) For the controversial advertisement Nike aired with the voice of Tiger’s late father seemingly lecturing his son for his wrongdoings.

Few; however, have considered the publicity Nike has received as a result of their decisions. Tiger Woods appears to be at the top of his game despite a 6 month absence from competition, and professional golf going into this weekend’s Masters at Augusta National, has never been bigger.

While I’m not here to defend Tiger Wood’s actions as a person, I am here to defend Nike’s decisions as a company. If Tiger returns as the world’s top golfer once again, allegations against him will likely be forgotten within a year as focus turns back to his on-course performance.

 Instead of panicking, Nike has turned what could have been a PR disaster, into publicity for their own brand. Their recent advertisement does not ignore Tiger’s recent scandal, something Nike could have easily been criticized for. In fact, with the ad, Nike has taken to acknowledging Tiger’s mistakes, suggesting that sometimes reflection and change are required from even the best. Despite taking some criticism, the ad has been viewed by millions on YouTube and sets the brand up nicely for association with Tiger’s inevitable comeback story.

What do you think of Nike’s continued support of Tiger Woods?